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REBLOG! What’s the Biggest Killer? DIET! Overtaking 3rd World Disease

Posted: September 23rd, 2015 | Author: | Filed under: Health News, The Organic Gourmet | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on REBLOG! What’s the Biggest Killer? DIET! Overtaking 3rd World Disease

Scientists figured out the biggest contributor to early deaths across the world25 years ago, in 1990, maternal and child malnutrition, unsafe drinking water and sanitation were the leading risks for death. Today, unsurprisingly, poor diet has overtaken third world problems as the biggest contributor to early death around the world.

According to new analysis from the leading authority on global disease diet is the second highest (clearly aside from age) killer.

Smoking cigarettes still carries the highest risk factor of premature death, followed by high blood pressure and obesity.

However, the Institute of Health Metrics and Evaluation – IMHE – says that a combination of dietary factors, from eating too few fruits and vegetables, nuts, and whole grains to too much sodium and cholesterol, is taking a toll on health across the globe.

The IMHE’s study found that the largest contributor to early death globally is high blood pressure, in which age and family history partly play a roll, but so do obesity, smoking, excessive salt consumption, lack of exercise, and drinking large amounts of alcohol.

Noteworthy, alcohol is also one of the top 10 risk factors associated with the highest number of deaths for both men and women.

The study looked at 14 dietary risk factors. Cumulatively, unhealthy eating, including diets low in fruit, whole grains, and vegetables, and diets high in red meat and sugar-sweetened beverages contributed to more deaths than any other factor, causing ischemic heart disease, stroke and diabetes :: Read the full article »»»»


Australia’s War on Sugar

Posted: January 11th, 2014 | Author: | Filed under: Health News, The Organic Gourmet | Tags: , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Australia’s War on Sugar

Australia's War on SugarIn Australia the war on obesity is heating up, three major health organisations want a sugar tax on all sweetened beverages – not just soft drinks, but products like flavoured milk and sports drinks – to limit consumption and curb what is shaping up to be the nations biggest health problem.

However, Australia’s Food and Grocery Council – the body representing the food and beverage industry – is hitting back against health campaigns aimed at reducing sugar consumption, prompting critics to compare the industry’s position to that of tobacco companies fight against smoking decades ago.

In the UK a similar campaign ‘Action on Sugar’ has just launched, in the hope of reversing the obesity epidemic by targeting the “huge and unnecessary amounts of sugar that are currently being added to our food and soft drinks”. The campaign’s expert advisors include heavyweights from the scientific and medical community.

Last month leaked draft guidelines from the World Health Organisation – WHO – suggested the organisation is considering halving the recommended daily intake of sugar from ten teaspoons to five. WHO’s “global strategy on diet” also says an unhealthy diet is a major risk factor for chronic disease and recommends reducing sugar intake to help prevent conditions like type 2 diabetes and dental problems :: Read the full article »»»»


FOLLOW US, WE’RE FAT!

Posted: July 30th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Hard Pill to Swallow, Socially Engineerd, That Human Condition | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment »

CHRONIC FAT OBESITYI’ve been wondering for a while just how long it would take for Obesity to move from being a medical issue to a social one, it seems we are right now on that cusp. Obesity has had so much bad publicity – deservingly so – over the past 5 years that the obese are striking back, no longer satisfied with the social stigma, and  often unable to lose the weight, the obese are becoming a large majority.

Fat activist Jackie Wykes recently posted a volatile question via theconversation.edu.au, asking How Anti Obesity Campaigns Re-inforce Stigma. Ms Wykes says “By focusing on weight as the problem and weight loss as the solution, social and economic inequalities are made invisible.” I’d reckon that in this country at least – and the world generally –  supermarkets would disagree entirely, never have groceries – fresh included – ever been so inexpensive, there is literally NO excuse today for BAD EATING HABITS!

According to Ms Wykes, health disparities between groups are blamed on individuals for not making healthy choices, ignoring the ways that the choices available to comfortably middle-class white Australians are often very different to those available to people on low incomes, to recent immigrants, or to Indigenous Australians.

This rhetoric clearly scirts the issue – yes obese people have rights, more rights than drug addicts, less than breast cancer patients, and about the same as rights as smokers –  in my mind the formula is pretty simple, EAT LESS! If you wish to make the argument complicated – it’s still diet based for the majority of obesity – then EAT CAREFULLY! :: Read the full article »»»»


CHRONIC FAT

Posted: April 10th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Socially Engineerd | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on CHRONIC FAT

CHRONIC FATAdmission! This post was inspired by a FAT CHICK – a self confessed – apparently happy FAT CHICK! Chrissie Swan, Semi-celebrity, ex-The Circle, and regular contributor to Melbourne’s The Age newspaper, penned a piece for the afore mentioned newspaper that has me ever so slightly incensed. The Age’s Sunday Life –  Life Matters – is all fluff, it’s meant to lighten up our Sunday read, feel good articles that mix well with coffee, bagels and balmy afternoons. What’s so standout about Ms Swan’s piece is that a half dozen people have so far had a good grizzle about what a trollish, trashy tale this happy fat chick has penned.

Clearly gnawing on fat isn’t a light hearted ramble.

“I’m overweight and happy” Chrissie Swan said “It hasn’t always been this way, I mean, I’ve always been happy, but I’ve lived with the dream of a goal weight hanging in front of me like a carrot (cake) since I was about 11 years old”

Shock Horror, it’s a hard concept to grasp, someone happy being a fatty!?

No one wants to be fat, it’s a myth, no one wants to feel unwanted or worse wanted for being a complete oddity. Being over weight is a complicated place to be. Losing weight is a massive chore, trust me inside this average body lurks a fat person trying to get out. Keeping that fat chick in check is a daily struggle. Emotions, Hormones, Food and even Genes all seem to be against us staying thin. Read the full article »»»»


Researchers Reveal How a Single Gene Mutation Leads to Uncontrolled Obesity

Posted: March 20th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Medical Research, Science, Science News | Tags: , , , | Comments Off on Researchers Reveal How a Single Gene Mutation Leads to Uncontrolled Obesity

The discovery offers clues about how to turn on brain sensitivity to leptin and insulin, hormones that turn off appetite.

Researchers Reveal How a Single Gene Mutation Leads to Uncontrolled ObesityResearchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have revealed how a mutation in a single gene is responsible for the inability of neurons to effectively pass along appetite suppressing signals from the body to the right place in the brain. What results is obesity caused by a voracious appetite.
Their study, published March 18th on Nature Medicine‘s website, suggests there might be a way to stimulate expression of that gene to treat obesity caused by uncontrolled eating.

The research team specifically found that a mutation in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) gene in mice does not allow brain neurons to effectively pass leptin and insulin chemical signals through the brain. In humans, these hormones, which are released in the body after a person eats, are designed to “tell” the body to stop eating. But if the signals fail to reach correct locations in the hypothalamus, the area in the brain that signals satiety, eating continues. Read the full article »»»»