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Science Fact or Fiction Survey Confuddles Australians

Posted: July 16th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Science, Science News | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on Science Fact or Fiction Survey Confuddles Australians

Science Fact or Fiction Survey Confuddles AustraliansMore than 40 percent of Australians don’t know how long it takes the Earth to travel around the sun, according to a new survey, which also dug-up that nearly 30 percent of Australians didn’t know if humans lived at the same time as dinosaurs.

The Australian Academy of Science surveyed more than 1,500 people, asking them very basic scientific questions.

The survey is a repeat of a 2010 questionnaire, asking the same basic questions, it seems we’ve slowed our thinking – as a nation – way back in 2010 more than 70 percent knew that the earth took a year to travel around the sun.

The surveys author says it’s a wake-up call, he’s also worried that our knowledge of basic science might devolve even further, blaming popular culture and an insufficient school curriculum. We’re not alone however, the US seems to suffer similar symptoms  :: Read the full article »»»»


Researchers Reveal How a Single Gene Mutation Leads to Uncontrolled Obesity

Posted: March 20th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Medical Research, Science, Science News | Tags: , , , | Comments Off on Researchers Reveal How a Single Gene Mutation Leads to Uncontrolled Obesity

The discovery offers clues about how to turn on brain sensitivity to leptin and insulin, hormones that turn off appetite.

Researchers Reveal How a Single Gene Mutation Leads to Uncontrolled ObesityResearchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have revealed how a mutation in a single gene is responsible for the inability of neurons to effectively pass along appetite suppressing signals from the body to the right place in the brain. What results is obesity caused by a voracious appetite.
Their study, published March 18th on Nature Medicine‘s website, suggests there might be a way to stimulate expression of that gene to treat obesity caused by uncontrolled eating.

The research team specifically found that a mutation in the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf) gene in mice does not allow brain neurons to effectively pass leptin and insulin chemical signals through the brain. In humans, these hormones, which are released in the body after a person eats, are designed to “tell” the body to stop eating. But if the signals fail to reach correct locations in the hypothalamus, the area in the brain that signals satiety, eating continues. Read the full article »»»»


New Study Says Climate Obsessives Swayed By Media

Posted: March 14th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Medical Research, Science, Science News | Tags: , , , , | Comments Off on New Study Says Climate Obsessives Swayed By Media

Cankler Science News - New Study Says Obsessives Swayed By MediaA new published study has highlighted how the media influences opinion on emotive issues. The study undertaken by the University of Sydney was carried out to investigate whether climate change had any impact on the nature of the obsessions or compulsions experienced by sufferers of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – OCD – The study takes reference from a 1994 study which found that some children developed obsessive thoughts about Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome – HIV/Aids – once media reports on the virus became common place.

We suggest that mental health professionals need to be aware of, and assess for the presence of such concerns” the study recommended.

This latest study has found that many patients suffering with OCD are worrying about the effects of climate change and global warming. Dr Mairwen Jones and her co-authors looked at 50 patients attending an anxiety disorders clinic. They found one-third of the patients had anxiety about the effects of climate change. The most common concerns were wasting water, gas and electricity, often leading to an obsessive checking to make sure utilities and appliances were switched off. Read the full article »»»»


Loose Cable Behind CERN Faster-than-light Result

Posted: February 25th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Science, Science News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Loose Cable Behind CERN Faster-than-light Result

Loose Cable Behind CERN Faster-than-light ResultThe controversial finding that cast a large shadow of doubt over Einstein’s belief that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light might have been caused by a loose cable, the lab behind the result said. Physicists at the CERN laboratory near Geneva appeared to contradict Albert Einstein last year when they reported that sub-atomic particles called neutrinos could travel fractions of a second faster than light. Einstein had said nothing could travel faster than light.

James Gillies, a spokesman for CERN, said the lab’s startling result was now in doubt. Earlier on Wednesday, the website ScienceInsider reported the surprising result was down to a loose fibre optic cable linking a Global Positioning System satellite receiver to a computer. ScienceInsider is run by the respected American Association for the Advancement of Science. Mr Gillies confirmed a flaw in the GPS system was now suspected as a possible cause for the surprising reading. Gillies’ says further testing was needed before any definite conclusions could be reached. Read the full article »»»»


Chinese Tree Offers Hope For Alcoholics

Posted: January 17th, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: Medical Research, Science, Science News | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , | Comments Off on Chinese Tree Offers Hope For Alcoholics

Read the full article »»»»Researchers at the University of California – UCLA –  are investigating a 500-year-old Chinese hangover cure in the hope they can put its properties into a pill to help alcoholics and stave off hangovers. Alcoholism is a huge problem globally, killing 2.5 million people each year according to the World Health Organization. There has been serious research recently looking for drugs that stop people drinking, or at least encourage them to drink less.

In an article published in the latest issue of the Journal of Neuroscience, they describe how dihydromyricetin blocks the action of alcohol on the brain and neurons and also reduces voluntary alcohol consumption, with no major side effects, in an early study with rats. Only an estimated 13 percent of people identified as having an alcohol use disorder receive medical treatment, partly due to a lack of effective medications without major side effects. Read the full article »»»»